nortonfamilynet.jpg (33393 bytes)
Home

Signature of Mary Norton
Mary Norton, mother of Amelia "Milly" Norton signs a wedding permission.
This is the only instance of the mother of this family appearing on any record. Milly is her youngest child.

Signature of John Norton
John Norton of Bourbon signs a wedding bond for Milly Norton to marry John Black. However, his relationship to Milly is not stated, but it is quite certain that this is John Norton of Bourbon, a brother of Milly who served with John Black in the Revolution.

On July 11, 1792 in Bourbon, KY Mary Norton, the mother of Milly Norton gave permission for the marriage of Milly to John Black.

Another child, Sarah Norton also marries on March 5, 1793 in Bourbon, just four months earlier but the father and mother don't sign or appear on that document. This is the 2nd marriage for Sarah. Her first husband, William Farney died (abt 1781) during the Revolutionary War while they were living in Rockingham, VA and left her with one child, John Farney. The guardian of this child was John Norton, a brother of Sarah. This brother John Norton who married Sarah Spencer in Bourbon, signed with an X on the guardian document as well as an estate document in Rockingham.

Signature



Mary Norton Document -

For Pledges To Let John Black and my Daughter milley Norton have marriage lisence and this shall be your warrent Given and by my hand

Mary Norton
July 11, 1792

This document appears to be written in her own hand.


John Norton Document

Know all men by these presents we John Black & John Norton are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency the Gov. of Kentucky in full sum of £50 to which payment to be made we bind ourselves our heirs & by here presents ______? Dated July 11: 1792

The C_______ of the above obligation is such that wheras the Recder Clerk of bourbon hath this day issued License for the marriage of John Black & Milly Norton.

Now if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage or no Dmage accrued by means of said license being forced the above to be void.

John Black
John Norton

The above document is written in the clerks hand and signed by both John Black and John Norton.